The Utah Fun Dome (49th Street Galleria) Discussion Thread
#41
Aw man the memories! Wishing it was still open so we could meet up in Lagoon's off-season!
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#42
(11-07-2017, 06:34 PM)jetstar2 Wrote: Blackbeard's Mini Golf was the best themed thing ever to exist in the state of Utah. Apparently it was destroyed to make way for the pet center Frown It was super dark, had a piratey nautical theme with a waterway running through it and assorted fountains, balconies and other false buildings looking over it, and constant shifts in elevation. One of the holes had a full size anchor on the green. I'm pretty excited to find this single picture of it after all these years:




An image like this was already posted here, but I'm still posting mine:

I like the Cherry Hills mini golf better than I liked the Galleria's, but you could go to the Galleria all year long! I lost many balls in the fountain in the middle of the course. It was really fun. I also really loved the indoor batting cages, laser tag, and of course the video games. I feel like Boondocks is all the way there and then some, but the Galleria was just so unique at the time. Since it was in the golden age of video games it was more important than most places in the state. The only comparable arcades were in Crossroads (which had two), Lagoon, and University of Utah Student Union. I hate that they couldn't make it go as a fun center anymore. It is still my landmark though after 4500 S.

-Z
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#43
I wonder if Cherry Hill has ever considered a winter dome for their course? I would play it during the off season.
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#44
(11-10-2017, 03:08 PM)gregwibert Wrote: I wonder if Cherry Hill has ever considered a winter dome for their course? I would play it during the off season.

Win I agree. It's my favorite course.
[Image: 63b8acec93efb554cba7644d62fa3a0c.png]

 Expert on SALTAIR -- The Coney Island of the West
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#45
I see a lot of interesting questions and speculations on what happened to the 49th Street Galleria / Fun Dome and all of its “stuff”.

I worked there from 1997 until about two years after they closed so I would be more than happy to give you all the full story...

P.S.

I wrote this on the phone so I apologize in advance for any spelling and grammar errors... i’ll go back and correct it later on. Perhaps I’ll just make a Wikipedia page. There are probably only a few people out there who know more about the 49th Galleria than I do, and I doubt that they would ever be willing to say anything about it.... but I know who they are.

Besides that I’m probably the only one who was ever interested enough to research the place beyond the time that I worked there. Feel free to ask questions.

49th Street Galleria:
As we all know the place started out as the 49th St. galleria... but what a lot of people don’t know is that it wasn’t the only 49th St. Galleria. They actually build a second location that was attached to a mall in Philadelphia, and had two more locations under construction. Things started to go downhill pretty rapidly for the owners of the 49th St. Galleria. First there was a controversy over manager that was sexually molesting children, then they started having problems with the creditors, the equipment at their second location had never been paid for, and they started having problems with the malls regarding their third and fourth locations that where under construction. In the end the company went under, however the original owners managed to embezzle a lot of money from their own company before they finally lost it... so I’m sure they made out just fine. (As a sidenote they also develop the apartments surrounding the 49th)

The third and fourth location were never completed. The Philadelphia location was overrun with gang activity. It was closed and turned into a Burlington Coat Factory. The Utah location was auctioned off. A guy named Larry Kates from California got the property for a fraction of what it cost to originally build, he invested a lot of money into building new attractions, and renamed it the Utah Fun Dome to distance himself from former controversy.

Attractions:
Casey’s Dugout:
This area was originally batting cages. The batting cages were removed, the upper floor was extended as an area to place rides, and the lower level became the racetrack. Eventually the upper part became classrooms, an the lower area became a buffet restaurant. Now it’s a part of an educational facility.

Roller Town USA:
This was originally a roller skating rink. After it became the Utah Fun Dome it was still a skating rink, however it was converted into a haunted house around Halloween. Eventually the skating rink was closed and it was converted into something called cycle ball, which was basically paintball that used Styrofoam balls instead of paint balls... it turned out to be a safety hazard so it was closed down. At this point it was divided into three areas. The first area was the laser game where two teams sat on the opposite side of the room and shot moving targets. The second area was transformed into the new laser tag arena after the old one had been converted into party rooms. And the third area became a fun house... which was actually pretty cool. After the Fun Dome closed it became classrooms, then it became meeting rooms, then it became medical exam rooms for pets, and now it’s classrooms again.

The Arcade Pits:
There was originally 4 Arcade Pits on the main level. There was the main square one behind the stairs. That is where most of the games were until they were moved upstairs. After that the area became bumper cars, then a ride attraction called the tanks where you would shoot balls at each other in drivable tanks. Then some rides for small children were installed... along with the Sega R360 arcade game. After the Fun Dome closed it became an eating area with tables... now it’s a part of an educational facility

There were too small round pits just inside the entrance. One of them didn’t have arcade games in it for very long before the FD1 motion simulator was installed in it. The second one had air hockey table in it, up until the Fun Dome close... both of those pits have since been filled in with concrete, but you can still tell where they used to be.

There was another larger round pit in front of the stage. Eventually the carousel was built on top of this pit. The pit was restored after the Fun Dome closed, but has since been filled in with concrete, but you can still tell where used to be.

Bowling Green:
This are was a bowling alley and remained relatively the same from the time it opened until the time that the Fun Dome closed. It was gutted out during the time of the Utah Pet Center. It is now the home of K2 The Church, and is completely unrecognizable.

Blackbeards:
The main part of this area was a miniature golf course. Eventually it was gutted out and became medical facilities for pets. and now is a part of an educational facility.

There was various other attractions in the area next to Blackbeard. Originally it was an open laser tag area. You could actually see the people playing laser tag while you were golfing. They also had a gravitron ride in this area. The laser tag eventually close, and the area was divided into two parts. One part became a new enclose laser tag area, and the other part became a 3-D motion simulator theater (this was actually were the original laser tag was). The graviton was removed. The Laser tag area eventually became a large part room. Most of this area is unrecognizable.

Upstairs:
There was originally two upstairs areas. The area above the stage was party rooms. The main staircase lead to an area that was mostly under utilized during the 49th St. galleria days. It had the theme of a proverbial village much like the main lobby. The main attraction up there was a train, there were also a few midway style skill games. When the batting cages were removed the second floor was expanded. Rides were installed, The train was removed, and the arcade was moved upstairs. Some years later the train eventually returned on the lower level as a part of the kiddie rides area. This area is now classrooms.

Outside Attractions:
There was a bungee and a reverse bungee slingshot attraction. They also build a second outdoor golf course a few years before the Fun Dome closed. The fire department often used the bungee tower to practice running up and down the stairs. There was a rumor that Murray city wanted to buy the tower for the fire department to use but the owner refused. I have a video of them pulling down the bungee tower... it’s kind of cool to see.

There was a little house next to the bungee tower where all of the bungee equipment was stored and where you would buy tickets for the outdoor attractions. It was destroyed in a fire during the six years that the building was abandoned.

There was also three homes on the property where the owner would let the managers live. One of them was demolished to expand the parking lot when the Fun Dome was there. The other two were demolished by the current owner.


Utah Fun Dome and the Downfall:
I’ll never forget the day that I went to work and there was a big yellow “conditional use hearing” notice on the front of the building. We later came to find out that the owner had decided to close the Fun Dome and turn it into a college. The first phase of the transition was the skating ring followed by the second phase which was the upstairs arcade area. The owner spent a lot of money to renovate the areas that formerly housed the skating rink and arcade. He even set up a woodshop to custom build all of the desks...

The school was to be called Salt Lake Valley University, and then changed to Salt Lake Valley College for legal reasons. It got about 30 days from opening phase 1. I believe they were going to initially focus on real estate and technical education. They even had a school administrator and staff... well... The owner decided that he didn’t want to turn it in to a school anymore. So he let all the school related staff go and then decided that he wanted to turn it into a quasi-convention center.

So they started demoing a lot of the work that they had just done, they merged several classrooms to make larger meeting rooms, And the owner also purchased a hotel over on 5300 south. He completely renovated the hotel and renamed it the Pavilion Inn. Salt Lake Valley College was then renamed to Salt Lake Pavilion.

Before Salt Lake Pavilion got to the point of opening the owner once again changed his mind and decided that he wanted to turn it into some sort of weird restaurant mall that would have a lot of different places to eat, it kept the Salt Lake Pavilion name... I left around the time they were preparing to open the first restaurant, which was a buffet located where the race track used to be... however, I still knew people who work there... so the story continues.

That venture didn’t work out so he decided to turn it into the Utah Pet Center. They ripped out Blackbeards golf and converted that and the former skating ring into the first phase of the Utah Pet Center. They gutted out the bowling alley, but never got to the point of building anything there. The owner actually hired a lot of really good veterinarians and even relocated families to Utah from out of state... then one Friday morning they all went into work to discover that they no longer had jobs.

The owner closed the Utah Pet Center and eventually lost the building, I believe for owing back taxes. He held onto the hotel for quite a while, which he owned under a different company name, until selling it to Quality Inn just about one or two years ago.

As for the 49th St. Galleria. The building sat abandoned for six years. At one point a developer was going to buy the property and convert it into residential and retail mix, but that fell through. Finally the current occupant purchase the building and converted it into a charter school and a church.

Just before it was renovated somebody went in there and videotaped a lot of the place. The main lobby was in pretty good shape. But the rest of the building was a disaster. The roof started failing back when it was the Utah Fun Dome, and proper repairs were never made. After sitting abandoned for six years there was considerable damage. It was also a twisted mess of the various failed construction projects over the years. There was a mold abatement done where they had to tear a lot of sheet rock out of the place. The new owners replaced the roof and the front of the building. Most of the building is now unrecognizable except for the main lobby which the current owner have restored.

The Stuff:
Most of the good Arcade equipment sold pretty early on. Nickelcade purchased a good portion of it. A few pieces of equipment were even purchased by Boondocks and Hollywood Connection. It went to a lot of various places... but there was still a lot of arcade equipment that didn’t sell.

Most of the rides for small children that were downstairs sold pretty quick. The Tornado and the Himalayas from upstairs also sold. The other rides from upstairs, including the Dragon roller coaster, were actually scrapped. When the rides were designed, they were not intended to go on the second story of a building, so the owner had them structurally modified so that they wouldn’t put stress on the building. He didn’t want the modifications to cause a liability, so he opted to scrap them instead of selling them. The carousel was disassembled and I’m actually not 100% sure what happened to it, but I think it was destroyed.

At one point in time they actually had all of the remaining arcade games and ride equipment in warehouse that was destroyed in a fire. I’m not sure if the carousel was destroyed in the fire or not... but it seems like I heard that it was. Some of the arcade equipment was salvageable, but I think a lot of the stuff got junked at that point.

It was really sad about the Sega R360s. The owner actually traveled around the country and bought four of them. We only ever used two of them. The other two were for parts. There were actually very few of them that were ever produced in English... they ended up getting put behind the building and probably sustained water damage. I know somebody eventually took them but I don’t know if they were salvageable... they probably ended up being used as parts.

We did order huge quantities of tickets at a time. We also had a lot of tokens... it all ended up with various people. We used to get a lot of Chucky e cheese tokens there because they were the same size. I used to give employees handfuls of Chucky E. Cheese tokens and tell them to go over there and have a good time. One time I had about $6000 in Chucky cheese tokens. One day they came over and were desperately looking for tokens... The GM told me to let them have them. They never gave us any of our tokens back... but that’s okay because the Fun Dome used to go over to Chucky E. Cheese and drop some coins in when they were desperate for ski balls... if you catch the drift.

The Fun Dome Buses:
The owner was an eccentric rich guy who likened to buy some random crap. One day he bought six used buses that were in horrible shape. He had them painted with the Fun Dome logo. The plan was to have them waiting at various places to bring people to the Fun Dome. They really only ever had one running at a time. It went to the Trax station. The other ones were pretty much used for parts because they were in such bad shape. When the Fun Dome closed they started getting vandalized. Eventually they ended up at a stripping yard in North Salt Lake where they were stripped down. I remember seeing them there as I was driving down the street one day.

The Mysterious Storage Bins:
There were a lot of storage bins behind the building which I’ve seen mentioned a few times. I did inventory on them after the Fun Dome closed. There was just a lot of random stuff in them. A couple of them had a lot of older arcade games from the 49th St. Galleria days... The owner didn’t get rid of anything. One of them had old roller skates in it from when they converted to rollerblades. There was a lot of old office stuff and just a lot of junk. One of them was actually used to keep all of the redemption prizes and tickets in.

The Gun Incident:
Yes, there was a gun incident. No, it was not the reason that the Fun Dome Closed. The Fun Dome closed because of an owner who did not know how to run a business, because of a long series of bad management decisions that led to a decline in business, but most importantly... It closed because the owner was at the end of a seven year tax break and wanted to do something different with the place. :/

The Fun Dome started out strong with good management. Then it just started going down the crapper. We ended up with a GM who started making really bad decisions, and who didn’t know how to treat employees... which I think translated the poor customer service. We were originally opened seven days a week. First they started closing on Sundays, then on weekdays. It got to a point where we were only open on Friday evening and Saturday... they got rid of the golden student award programs and other promotions that brought a lot of customers in.

Finally we did get rid of that GM. After a couple of short term GMs we did end up with somebody who had been there for a long time and who genuinely did care about the place... he started treating the employees better and opened more days. The turnover rate was down, The employees were pretty happy, and it seemed like business was actually starting to pick up a little bit... but the truth is, we didn’t go out of business... The owner was just some crazy eccentric rich guy who wanted to use the places as a business experiment. In fact the guy actually hated Utah. He was a very successful real estate investor. But from what I understand he had never run a successful business outside of real estate.


An Alternate Reality:
This is something that not many people know, but being in the industry I’ve met a lot of people, so I’ve come to learn a few things.

As it turns out... The Fun Dome closed down right around the time that Boondocks decided that it wanted to open its first Utah location. Believe it or not they actually wanted to buy the Fun Dome, renovate it, and that would have become Boondocks. But the owner didn’t want to sell it... he had a few crazy ideas that he wanted to explore, and because of that crazy ass guy we lost something really cool.
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#46
(01-06-2018, 01:08 AM)df78 Wrote: I see a lot of interesting questions and speculations on what happened to the 49th Street Galleria / Fun Dome and all of its “stuff”.

I worked there from 1997 until about two years after they closed so I would be more than happy to give you all the full story...

P.S.

I wrote this on the phone so I apologize in advance for any spelling and grammar errors... i’ll go back and correct it later on. Perhaps I’ll just make a Wikipedia page. There are probably only a few people out there who know more about the 49th Galleria than I do, and I doubt that they would ever be willing to say anything about it.... but I know who they are.

Besides that I’m probably the only one who was ever interested enough to research the place beyond the time that I worked there. Feel free to ask questions.

49th Street Galleria:
As we all know the place started out as the 49th St. galleria... but what a lot of people don’t know is that it wasn’t the only 49th St. Galleria. They actually build a second location that was attached to a mall in Philadelphia, and had two more locations under construction. Things started to go downhill pretty rapidly for the owners of the 49th St. Galleria. First there was a controversy over manager that was sexually molesting children, then they started having problems with the creditors, the equipment at their second location had never been paid for, and they started having problems with the malls regarding their third and fourth locations that where under construction. In the end the company went under, however the original owners managed to embezzle a lot of money from their own company before they finally lost it... so I’m sure they made out just fine. (As a sidenote they also develop the apartments surrounding the 49th)

The third and fourth location were never completed. The Philadelphia location was overrun with gang activity. It was closed and turned into a Burlington Coat Factory. The Utah location was auctioned off. A guy named Larry Kates from California got the property for a fraction of what it cost to originally build, he invested a lot of money into building new attractions, and renamed it the Utah Fun Dome to distance himself from former controversy.

Attractions:
Casey’s Dugout:
This area was originally batting cages. The batting cages were removed, the upper floor was extended as an area to place rides, and the lower level became the racetrack. Eventually the upper part became classrooms, an the lower area became a buffet restaurant. Now it’s a part of an educational facility.

Roller Town USA:
This was originally a roller skating rink. After it became the Utah Fun Dome it was still a skating rink, however it was converted into a haunted house around Halloween. Eventually the skating rink was closed and it was converted into something called cycle ball, which was basically paintball that used Styrofoam balls instead of paint balls... it turned out to be a safety hazard so it was closed down. At this point it was divided into three areas. The first area was the laser game where two teams sat on the opposite side of the room and shot moving targets. The second area was transformed into the new laser tag arena after the old one had been converted into party rooms. And the third area became a fun house... which was actually pretty cool. After the Fun Dome closed it became classrooms, then it became meeting rooms, then it became medical exam rooms for pets, and now it’s classrooms again.

The Arcade Pits:
There was originally 4 Arcade Pits on the main level. There was the main square one behind the stairs. That is where most of the games were until they were moved upstairs. After that the area became bumper cars, then a ride attraction called the tanks where you would shoot balls at each other in drivable tanks. Then some rides for small children were installed... along with the Sega R360 arcade game. After the Fun Dome closed it became an eating area with tables... now it’s a part of an educational facility

There were too small round pits just inside the entrance. One of them didn’t have arcade games in it for very long before the FD1 motion simulator was installed in it. The second one had air hockey table in it, up until the Fun Dome close... both of those pits have since been filled in with concrete, but you can still tell where they used to be.

There was another larger round pit in front of the stage. Eventually the carousel was built on top of this pit. The pit was restored after the Fun Dome closed, but has since been filled in with concrete, but you can still tell where used to be.

Bowling Green:
This are was a bowling alley and remained relatively the same from the time it opened until the time that the Fun Dome closed. It was gutted out during the time of the Utah Pet Center. It is now the home of K2 The Church, and is completely unrecognizable.

Blackbeards:
The main part of this area was a miniature golf course. Eventually it was gutted out and became medical facilities for pets. and now is  a part of an educational facility.

There was various other attractions in the area next to Blackbeard. Originally it was an open laser tag area. You could actually see the people playing laser tag while you were golfing. They also had a gravitron ride in this area. The laser tag eventually close, and the area was divided into two parts. One part became a new enclose laser tag area, and the other part became a 3-D motion simulator theater (this was actually were the original laser tag was). The graviton was removed. The Laser tag area eventually became a large part room. Most of this area is unrecognizable.

Upstairs:
There was originally two upstairs areas. The area above the stage was party rooms. The main staircase lead to an area that was mostly under utilized during the 49th St. galleria days. It had the theme of a proverbial village much like the main lobby. The main attraction up there was a train, there were also a few midway style skill games. When the batting cages were removed the second floor was expanded. Rides were installed, The train was removed, and the arcade was moved upstairs. Some years later the train eventually returned on the lower level as a part of the kiddie rides area. This area is now classrooms.

Outside Attractions:
There was a bungee and a reverse bungee slingshot attraction. They also build a second outdoor golf course a few years before the Fun Dome closed. The fire department often used the bungee tower to practice running up and down the stairs. There was a rumor that Murray city wanted to buy the tower for the fire department to use but the owner refused. I have a video of them pulling down the bungee tower... it’s kind of cool to see.

There was a little house next to the bungee tower where all of the bungee equipment was stored and where you would buy tickets for the outdoor attractions. It was destroyed in a fire during the six years that the building was abandoned.

There was also three homes on the property where the owner would let the managers live. One of them was demolished to expand the parking lot when the Fun Dome was there. The other two were demolished by the current owner.


Utah Fun Dome and the Downfall:
I’ll never forget the day that I went to work and there was a big yellow “conditional use hearing” notice on the front of the building. We later came to find out that the owner had decided to close the Fun Dome and turn it into a college. The first phase of the transition was the skating ring followed by the second phase which was the upstairs arcade area. The owner spent a lot of money to renovate the areas that formerly housed the skating rink and arcade. He even set up a woodshop to custom build all of the desks...

The school was to be called Salt Lake Valley University, and then changed to Salt Lake Valley College for legal reasons. It got about 30 days from opening phase 1. I believe they were going to initially focus on real estate and technical education. They even had a school administrator and staff... well... The owner decided that he didn’t want to turn it in to a school anymore. So he let all the school related staff go and then decided that he wanted to turn it into a quasi-convention center.

So they started demoing a lot of the work that they had just done, they merged several classrooms to make larger meeting rooms, And the owner also purchased a hotel over on 5300 south. He completely renovated the hotel and renamed it the Pavilion Inn. Salt Lake Valley College was then renamed to Salt Lake Pavilion.

Before Salt Lake Pavilion got to the point of opening the owner once again changed his mind and decided that he wanted to turn it into some sort of weird restaurant mall that would have a lot of different places to eat, it kept the Salt Lake Pavilion name... I left around the time they were preparing to open the first restaurant, which was a buffet located where the race track used to be... however, I still knew people who work there... so the story continues.

That venture didn’t work out so he decided to turn it into the Utah Pet Center. They ripped out Blackbeards golf and converted that and the former skating ring into the first phase of the Utah Pet Center. They gutted out the bowling alley, but never got to the point of building anything there. The owner actually hired a lot of really good veterinarians and even relocated families to Utah from out of state... then one Friday morning they all went into work to discover that they no longer had jobs.

The owner closed the Utah Pet Center and eventually lost the building, I believe for owing back taxes. He held onto the hotel for quite a while, which he owned under a different company name, until selling it to Quality Inn just about one or two years ago.

As for the 49th St. Galleria. The building sat abandoned for six years. At one point a developer was going to buy the property and convert it into residential and retail mix, but that fell through. Finally the current occupant purchase the building and converted it into a charter school and a church.

Just before it was renovated somebody went in there and videotaped a lot of the place. The main lobby was in pretty good shape. But the rest of the building was a disaster. The roof started failing back when it was the Utah Fun Dome, and proper repairs were never made. After sitting abandoned for six years there was considerable damage. It was also a twisted mess of the various failed construction projects over the years. There was a mold abatement done where they had to tear a lot of sheet rock out of the place. The new owners replaced the roof and the front of the building. Most of the building is now unrecognizable except for the main lobby which the current owner have restored.

The Stuff:
Most of the good Arcade equipment sold pretty early on. Nickelcade purchased a good portion of it. A few pieces of equipment were even purchased by Boondocks and Hollywood Connection. It went to a lot of various places... but there was still a lot of arcade equipment that didn’t sell.

Most of the rides for small children that were downstairs sold pretty quick. The Tornado and the Himalayas from upstairs also sold. The other rides from upstairs, including the Dragon roller coaster, were actually scrapped. When the rides were designed, they were not intended to go on the second story of a building, so the owner had them structurally modified so that they wouldn’t put stress on the building. He didn’t want the modifications to cause a liability, so he opted to scrap them instead of selling them. The carousel was disassembled and I’m actually not 100% sure what happened to it, but I think it was destroyed.

At one point in time they actually had all of the remaining arcade games and ride equipment in warehouse that was destroyed in a fire. I’m not sure if the carousel was destroyed in the fire or not... but it seems like I heard that it was. Some of the arcade equipment was salvageable, but I think a lot of the stuff got junked at that point.

It was really sad about the Sega R360s. The owner actually traveled around the country and bought four of them. We only ever used two of them. The other two were for parts. There were actually very few of them that were ever produced in English... they ended up getting put behind the building and probably sustained water damage. I know somebody eventually took them but I don’t know if they were salvageable... they probably ended up being used as parts.

We did order huge quantities of tickets at a time. We also had a lot of tokens... it all ended up with various people. We used to get a lot of Chucky e cheese tokens there because they were the same size. I used to give employees handfuls of Chucky E. Cheese tokens and tell them to go over there and have a good time. One time I had about $6000 in Chucky cheese tokens. One day they came over and were desperately looking for tokens... The GM told me to let them have them. They never gave us any of our tokens back... but that’s okay because the Fun Dome used to go over to Chucky E. Cheese and drop some coins in when they were desperate for ski balls... if you catch the drift.

The Fun Dome Buses:
The owner was an eccentric rich guy who likened to buy some random crap. One day he bought six used buses that were in horrible shape. He had them painted with the Fun Dome logo. The plan was to have them waiting at various places to bring people to the Fun Dome. They really only ever had one running at a time. It went to the Trax station. The other ones were pretty much used for parts because they were in such bad shape. When the Fun Dome closed they started getting vandalized. Eventually they ended up at a stripping yard in North Salt Lake where they were stripped down. I remember seeing them there as I was driving down the street one day.

The Mysterious Storage Bins:
There were a lot of storage bins behind the building which I’ve seen mentioned a few times. I did inventory on them after the Fun Dome closed. There was just a lot of random stuff in them. A couple of them had a lot of older arcade games from the 49th St. Galleria days... The owner didn’t get rid of anything. One of them had old roller skates in it from when they converted to rollerblades. There was a lot of old office stuff and just a lot of junk. One of them was actually used to keep all of the redemption prizes and tickets in.


An Alternate Reality:
This is something that not many people know, but being in the industry I’ve met a lot of people, so I’ve come to learn a few things.

As it turns out... The Fun Dome closed down right around the time that Boondocks decided that it wanted to open its first Utah location. Believe it or not they actually wanted to buy the Fun Dome, renovate it, and that would have become Boondocks.  But the owner didn’t want to sell it... he had a few crazy ideas that he wanted to explore, and because of that crazy ass guy we lost something really cool.


Thanks a ton for the trove of information! I can remember many of the things you describe being at the 49th street galleria/fun dome. I never saw the fun house/foam ball range things the skating rink became though. I also had no idea that there were more Gallerias... The 49th street Galleria was named so because it was on 49th south... did the other locations share the name?
Rename Roller Coaster to 'Lagoon's Classic Roller Coaster'
  • A distinct name
  • Adjective + Roller Coaster format everybody uses (white roller coaster, wooden roller coaster, etc.)
  • Describes the ride
  • Includes the current name
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#47
(01-06-2018, 01:56 AM)jetstar2 Wrote: Thanks a ton for the trove of information! I can remember many of the things you describe being at the 49th street galleria/fun dome. I never saw the fun house/foam ball range things the skating rink became though. I also had no idea that there were more Gallerias... The 49th street Galleria was named so because it was on 49th south... did the other locations share the name?


Thanks for reading... I actually added an additional section (The Gun Incident)... might want to go back.

You are correct about the name. The Utah location was the original 49th St. Galleria... but the second one did in fact share its name. The third and fourth location also would have shared the name.

There is actually a commercial for the second location that has been posted on YouTube. It’s kind of spooky because the second location has a different design but is still very similar look.




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#48
If you want to catch a Classic glimpse of the Utah 49th St. galleria... Watch the music video for I think we’re alone now by Tiffany. Part of the music video was shot there... mostly towards the end.


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#49
(01-06-2018, 02:00 AM)df78 Wrote: Thanks for reading... I actually added an additional section (The Gun Incident)... might want to go back.

You are correct about the name. The Utah location was the original 49th St. Galleria... but the second one did in fact share its name. The third and fourth location also would have shared the name.

There is actually a commercial for the second location that has been posted on YouTube. It’s kind of spooky because the second location has a different design but is still very similar look.

https://youtu.be/MrRuWdd_7Ok


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Crazy, I can't believe I never knew about this. It looks sooo much like the one in Utah. Thanks for sharing!

I think Utah needs something like the 49th street Galleria to this day. The theming was fantastic. Lagoon could learn something from them. I miss it a lot. I remember playing these tiny little kids arcade games there that I never saw anywhere else. I also remember trading in my tickets for cheap toys on the second floor right near the entrance, I had way too many little plastic jumping frogs. I remember a lot of other stuff too of course.

I did learn a while ago that there was an accident when the Fun Dome was testing its roller coaster:
https://www.deseretnews.com/article/7578...-Dome.html
Rename Roller Coaster to 'Lagoon's Classic Roller Coaster'
  • A distinct name
  • Adjective + Roller Coaster format everybody uses (white roller coaster, wooden roller coaster, etc.)
  • Describes the ride
  • Includes the current name
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#50
(01-06-2018, 02:20 AM)jetstar2 Wrote: Crazy, I can't believe I never knew about this. It looks sooo much like the one in Utah. Thanks for sharing!

I think Utah needs something like the 49th street Galleria to this day. The theming was fantastic. Lagoon could learn something from them. I miss it a lot. I remember playing these tiny little kids arcade games there that I never saw anywhere else. I also remember trading in my tickets for cheap toys on the second floor right near the entrance, I had way too many little plastic jumping frogs. I remember a lot of other stuff too of course.

I did learn a while ago that there was an accident when the Fun Dome was testing its roller coaster:
https://www.deseretnews.com/article/7578...-Dome.html


I believe there was a legal battle going on over that for quite a while. I don’t think anybody from the Fun Dome was actually involved with that at all. I think they did try to sue the Fun Dome but it was the company who installed the rides.

I was actually over the rides and arcade (not when that incident happened though).
One time they actually hired me a ride attendant who had seizures. I kept telling them that it was an accident waiting to happen... they didn’t seem to think it was a big deal, plus they were worried about discrimination lawsuits so they wouldn’t do anything about it. I tried to keep him on slick track which was the only ride that had two ride operators... I wasn’t allowed to dismiss him so finally I gave him a promotion to arcades because it terrified me. What’s even scarier is that before he came to the Fun Dome he was a ride operator at Lagoon... I think he went back there in the summer...not 100% though. And yes he had seizures multiple times while working..

Then they hired me a pregnant lady Who claimed she was on Loratab for her back (not recommended). I found her passed out in front of her ride. There was no GM there that night, they had left a security guard in charged. He was a Murray police officer that work at the Fun Dome part time. I told him that I could not have her operating a ride. He told me to put her on a ride that’s less dangerous. I told him no and that if he wanted her operating a ride that he would have to take care of it himself... he sent her home that night. but then on one of my days off they got her in there to operate the carousel... and she ended up falling down the stairs. I did mention that she was pregnant right? Luckily the baby was eventually born... but unluckily the father who also worked there would bring the baby in and fill its bottle up with Dr Pepper... charming :/
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